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Wagon & Cart

Each day, approximately 47 children are diagnosed with cancer in the United States, which means more than 17,000 children in the U.S. are diagnosed each year.

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MBFCC has quickly established a relationship with the medical community and, as such, has established partnerships with each of the eight Northern California Pediatric Oncology Hospitals. The hospitals' social workers directly refer new families to our organization to receive a Hospital Survival Wagon or Clinic Cart based on their needs. In addition, other parents living in the hospital with their child share our organization with new families.  

 

MBFCC delivers Hospital Survival Wagons and Clinic Carts to eight children’s Hospitals in Northern California. Our hospitals include Lucille Packards Children's Hospital Stanford in Palo Alto, Kaiser Permanente in Santa Clara, Oakland, and Roseville, UC Davis Children's Hospital and Sutter Health Children's Hospital in Sacramento, and UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital in Oakland and San Francisco. 

How you can help!

MBFCC has two essential care resources to provide parents/caregivers, a Hospital Survival Wagon and Clinic Cart.   The items included in our wagons and carts are essential items that we have identified through personal experience as crucial and necessary to care for a child during hospital stays, clinic visits as treatment continues as well as caring for their child at home. Our goal is that the Hospital Survival Wagon and Clinic Cart alleviates the added stress of ‘what do I need?’, ‘how do I get it?’, ‘am I able to afford all this?’ during a time when a family’s life has been suddenly turned upside down and they must be at their child’s side. These are essentially “cancer parent hacks” that have only been identified and passed down from experience in a way that only veteran parents can provide.

By donating to MBFCC, you can come alongside parents and caregivers to provide these vital items to help them successfully care for their child. This support alleviates an immediate financial and practical burden at a time when they should solely be focusing on caring for their child. It allows parents to have many critical tools they need to navigate their child’s lengthy treatments.  

Charitable Donations are Tax Deductible. Tax ID 88-2095855.

Descriptions of a few of the items that may be provided.  The content in the wagon and cart may vary depending on the caregiver's needs and the child's stage in their treatment journey.

  • Mattress Topper the sleeping arrangements in the hospital are not ideal for the parent/caregiver.  Generally, the caregiver is provided with a reclining chair. The mattress topper easily lays on the surface of the chair and provides comfort in addition to saving the parent's back and hips.

  • Mini Fridge for storing snacks and drinks.

  • Roku and Soundbar for streaming favorite shows and movies.

  • Silk Pillowcase for tender heads experiencing hair loss.

  • Bathroom Kit for mom or dad to take care of themselves.

  • Thermometer for when the child is neutropenic. Fevers in pediatric oncology patients, especially during neutropenia, are concerning for the presence of viruses.  Fever in this population is considered to be anything above 100.4.  Parents must have a reliable thermometer on hand to routinely check their child's temperature.

  • Weekly Pill Dispenser for the child’s medication. Unfortunately, most pediatric patients need to take medication during treatment. This pill dispenser helps organize medication.

  • Bed Caddy to stay organized. An organization tool that attaches to the hospital bed for easy access to the TV remote, cell phone, and any other item that your child needs to be able to access while in bed.

  • Collapsible Cooler Bag to pack food. Clinic treatments can be anywhere from 1-8 hours long. This cooler bag allows easy transport of your favorite perishable snacks and meals because fueling your body is essential to providing care.

  • Book Light allows the parent to be able to read or sit up with their child without turning on the lights during those long, anxious nights when a parent is unable to sleep.

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Wagon & Cart Items

Kaiser Permanente, Oakland

Testimonial from an Oncology
Social Worker: 
“Parents often tell me about the wonderful support they receive through Mama Bears. They speak of feeling part of a community that understands their cancer journey with their child, in a way they have not found among family and friends. The wagons and carts are filled with high-quality, thoughtful, and useful gifts. Parents often share they are getting much-needed rest for the first time since their child’s diagnosis because they can now be comfortable themselves. This organization helps children and families feel less isolated and alone. More recently, the child of one of our parents passed away and within days Mama Bears was providing support from one of their own bereaved parents. We are grateful to Mama Bears for all that they do!”
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UC DAVIS 

HOSPITAL 

Testimonial from a Clinical Social Worker:
"I am writing in support of the amazing organization “Mama Bears Fighting Childhood Cancer.” This program has been a driving force in supporting the patients and families being introduced to the life-changing journey of their child being diagnosed with Cancer. When a family is given the news of their child being diagnosed with this life-threatening illness, I have witnessed a sense of loneliness and uncertainty of how to navigate the months and years ahead. As the pediatric HemOnc social worker at UC Davis Children’s Hospital, it brings a wealth of reassurance that I can refer these families to Mama Bears. I have witnessed firsthand the relationships that are built within the program for parent’s support. Many of our patients as well are able to meet and develop lifelong relationships supporting one another.

One parent shared “Being referred to Mama Bears, has created pillars of support that I would have never been able to have had they not existed.”

One experience that I continue to find very meaningful was a family who had immigrated from Ukraine. With a very limited support system, limited financial income all while comprehending the cancer treatment journey their child was about to embark on, this family was left feeling lost and unsure of who to lean on. English being their second language was not a barrier when agreeing to be referred to Mama Bears. Because they were still admitted to the hospital, I was able to witness a wagon delivery. The initial reaction from the family was tears of joy. They felt heard, understood, and were given a sense of hope in a time of uncertainty. This opened up their hearts to receive support from others around them and built a sense of trust and community that they are not alone. This also opened up to the family feeling safe and comfortable communicating other needs that as a social worker could support them in navigating as well. Mama Bears has a way of opening the doors for all those working to better the child fighting cancer.

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Lucille Packard Children's Hospital Stanford

Testimonial from a Clinical Social Worker:
"I am writing in support of the amazing organization “Mama Bears Fighting Childhood Cancer.” This program has been a driving force in supporting the patients and families being introduced to the life-changing journey of their child being diagnosed with Cancer. When a family is given the news of their child being diagnosed with this life-threatening illness, I have witnessed a sense of loneliness and uncertainty of how to navigate the months and years ahead. As the pediatric HemOnc social worker at UC Davis Children’s Hospital, it brings a wealth of reassurance that I can refer these families to Mama Bears. I have witnessed firsthand the relationships that are built within the program for parent’s support. Many of our patients as well are able to meet and develop lifelong relationships supporting one another.

One parent shared “Being referred to Mama Bears, has created pillars of support that I would have never been able to have had they not existed.”

One experience that I continue to find very meaningful was a family who had immigrated from Ukraine. With a very limited support system, limited financial income all while comprehending the cancer treatment journey their child was about to embark on, this family was left feeling lost and unsure of who to lean on. English being their second language was not a barrier when agreeing to be referred to Mama Bears. Because they were still admitted to the hospital, I was able to witness a wagon delivery. The initial reaction from the family was tears of joy. They felt heard, understood, and were given a sense of hope in a time of uncertainty. This opened up their hearts to receive support from others around them and built a sense of trust and community that they are not alone. This also opened up to the family feeling safe and comfortable communicating other needs that as a social worker could support them in navigating as well. Mama Bears has a way of opening the doors for all those working to better the child fighting cancer.

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Wagon & Cart Deliveries

Delivery stats are updated at the end of each month.

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